Great Thinkers: Plato

Plato statue at the Academy of Athens building in Athens, Greece

 

“You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation”
– Plato

The safest general characterization of the European philosophical tradition is that it consists of a series of footnotes to Plato.
-Alfred North Whitehead (Process and Reality)

PLATO and Aristotle were the most influential of all philosophers, ancient, medieval, or modern; and of the two, it was Plato who had the greater effect upon subsequent ages. I say this for two reasons: first, that Aristotle himself is an outcome of Plato; second, that Christian theology and philosophy, at any rate until the thirteenth century, was much more Platonic than Aristotelian. It is necessary, therefore, in a history of philosophic thought, to treat Plato, and to a lesser degree Aristotle, more fully than any of their predecessors or successors.
-Bertrand Russell (The History of Western Philosophy)

 

TOC

  1. Facts
  2. Some Famous Publications
  3. Selected Thoughts & Ideas
    1. From The School of Life
    2. Wikipedia
    3. Bertrand Russell
    4. Will Durant
    5. The Philosophy Book (Big Ideas)
  4. Quotes
  5. Videos / Audio
  6. Sources

Continue reading “Great Thinkers: Plato”

Kris Kristofferson

Kristofferson

 

Kristoffer “Kris” Kristofferson (born June 22, 1936) is an American country music singer, songwriter, musician, and film actor. He is known for such hits as “Me and Bobby McGee”, “For the Good Times”, “Sunday Mornin’ Comin’ Down”, and “Help Me Make It Through the Night”. Kristofferson is the sole writer of most of his songs, and he has collaborated with various other figures of the Nashville scene such as Shel Silverstein. In 1985, Kristofferson joined fellow country artists Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson and Johnny Cash in forming the country music supergroup “The Highwaymen”. In 2004, Kristofferson was inducted into the Country Music Hall of
Fame. ~Wikipedia

Freedom’s just another word for nothing left to lose.

Tell the truth. Sing with passion. Work with laughter. Love with heart. ‘Cause that’s all that matters in the end.

Continue reading “Kris Kristofferson”

Patti Smith

Patti_Smith Photo – Edward Mapplethorpe

Patricia Lee “Patti” Smith (born December 30, 1946) is an American singer-songwriter, poet and visual artist, who became a highly influential component of the New York City punk rock movement with her 1975 debut album Horses.
Called the “Godmother of Punk”, her work was a fusion of rock and poetry. Smith’s most widely known song is “Because the Night”, which was co-written with Bruce Springsteen and reached number 13 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1978. In 2005, Patti Smith was named a Commander of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French Ministry of Culture, and in 2007, she was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. On November 17, 2010, she won the National Book Award for her memoir Just Kids. She is also a recipient of the 2011 Polar Music Prize.
~Wikipedia

Advice to the young:

“To be an artist — actually, to be a human being in these times — it’s all difficult. … What matters is to know what you want and pursue it.”

A writer, or any artist, can’t expect to be embraced by the people [but] you just keep doing your work — because you have to, because it’s your calling.

Continue reading “Patti Smith”

Van Morrison

From Wikipedia:

Van Morrison, OBE (born George Ivan Morrison; 31 August 1945) is a Northern Irish singer-songwriter and musician. His live performances at their best are described as transcendental, while some of his recordings, such as the studio albums Astral Weeks and Moondance and the live album It’s Too Late to Stop Now, are critically acclaimed and appear at the top of many greatest album lists.

Quotes:

Music is spiritual. The music business is not.

The future is keeping you out of the present time.

If it’s what you do and you can do it, then you do it.

I never paid attention to what was contemporary or what was commercial, it didn’t mean anything to me.

I educated myself. To me, school was boring.

In order to win you must be prepared to lose sometime. And leave one or two cards showing.

You can’t stay the same. If you’re a musician and a singer, you have to change, that’s the way it works.

I just need somewhere to dump all my negativity.

Every performance is different. That’s the beauty of it.

You take stuff from different places, and sometimes you stick a line in because it rhymes, not because it makes sense.

I do see value in music criticism. Most of the criticism I have received over the years has been very good.

There’s always got to be a struggle. What else is there? That’s what life is made of. I don’t know anything else. If there is, tell me about it.

When I was growing up in Belfast all I was listening to was American music.
Irish music was going on all around me, but that was nowhere. I was looking for
something diff erent.

Blues isn’t to do with black or white; blues is about the truth, and blues is
the truth.

Hearing the blues changed my life.

Well, it’s all about healing, isn’t it? Art, literature…. that goes way back. It comes back to this question: what’s your original face? Know what I mean? Who are you really? There is so many different kinds of healing but, if you are in alignment with yourself, then that in itself is going to be healing. If you’re trying to be something other, like something  superficial, trying to be someone you’re  not, then that would take you away from your true centre. Really, if you’re asking about those songs and those albums, then it’s about getting back to the true centre within yourself. That healing thing. It was nothing new. Music has always been about healing, hasn’t it? I was just doing my own thing on that.
(in an interview with Uncut Magazine about the album “Into The Music”)

When it’s not always raining there’ll be days like this. When there’s no one complaining there’ll be days like this. When everything falls into place like the flick of a switch. Well my mama told me there’ll be days like this.

Hark, now hear the sailors cry,
smell the sea, and feel the sky
let your soul & spirit fly, into the mystic…

Spiritual hunger and spiritual thirst
But you got to change it
On the inside first
To be satisfied

And I want to rock your gypsy soul
Just like way back in the days of old
And magnificently we will fold into the mystic

Viktor Frankl

From Wikipedia:

Viktor Emil Frankl, M.D., Ph.D. (March 26, 1905, Leopoldstadt, Vienna – September 2, 1997, Vienna) was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist as well as a Holocaust survivor. Frankl was the founder of logotherapy, which is a form of existential Analysis, the “Third Viennese School of Psychotherapy“. His best-selling book, Man’s Search for Meaning (published under a different title in 1959: From Death-Camp to Existentialism, and originally published in 1946 as Trotzdem Ja Zum Leben Sagen: Ein Psychologe erlebt das Konzentrationslager), chronicles his experiences as a concentration camp inmate which led him to discover the importance of finding meaning in all forms of existence, even the most sordid ones, and thus a reason to continue living. Frankl became one of the key figures in existential therapy and a prominent source of inspiration for humanistic psychologists.

Man’s Search for Meaning is a 1946 book by Viktor Frankl chronicling his experiences as a concentration camp inmate and describing his psychotherapeutic method of finding a reason to live. According to Frankl, the book intends to answer the question “How was everyday life in a concentration camp reflected in the mind of the average prisoner?” Part One constitutes Frankl’s analysis of his experiences in the concentration camps, while Part Two introduces his ideas of meaning and his theory of logotherapy. It is the second-most widely read Holocaust book in the bookstore of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

According to a survey conducted by the Book-of-the-Month Club and the Library of Congress, Man’s Search For Meaning belongs to a list of “the ten most influential books in the United States. At the time of the author’s death in 1997, the book had sold over 10 million copies and had been translated into 24 languages.

——

Quotes:

“When we are no longer able to change a situation, we are challenged to change ourselves.” ― Viktor E. Frankl, Man’s Search for Meaning

“Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.” ― Viktor E. Frankl, Man’s Search for Meaning

“But there was no need to be ashamed of tears, for tears bore witness that a man had the greatest of courage, the courage to suffer.” ― Viktor E. Frankl, Man’s Search for Meaning

“Don’t aim at success. The more you aim at it and make it a target, the more you are going to miss it. For success, like happiness, cannot be pursued; it must ensue, and it only does so as the unintended side effect of one’s personal dedication to a cause greater than oneself or as the by-product of one’s surrender to a person other than oneself. Happiness must happen, and the same holds for success: you have to let it happen by not caring about it. I want you to listen to what your conscience commands you to do and go on to carry it out to the best of your knowledge. Then you will live to see that in the long-run—in the long-run, I say!—success will follow you precisely because you had forgotten to think about it” ― Viktor E. Frankl, Man’s Search for Meaning

“Life is never made unbearable by circumstances, but only by lack of meaning and purpose.”

“For the first time in my life I saw the truth as it is set into song by so many poets, proclaimed as the final wisdom by so many thinkers. The truth – that Love is the ultimate and highest goal to which man can aspire. Then I grasped the meaning of the greatest secret that human poetry and human thought and belief have to impart: The salvation of man is through love and in love.” ― Viktor E. Frankl, Man’s Search for Meaning

“Between stimulus and response, there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom.” ― Viktor E. Frankl, Man’s Search for Meaning

“The attempt to develop a sense of humor and to see things in a humorous light is some kind of a trick learned while mastering the art of living.”