Category: Talk

  • Paul Zak: Trust, morality — and oxytocin

    From ted.com: What’s behind the human instinct to trust and to put each other’s well-being first? When you think about how much of the world works on a handshake or on holding a door open for somebody, why people cooperate is a huge question. Paul Zak researches oxytocin, a neuropeptide that affects our everyday social […]

  • David Allen – Getting Things Done

    From Wikipedia: David Allen (born December 28, 1945) is a productivity consultant who is best known as the creator of the time management method known as “Getting Things Done” . He grew up in Shreveport, Louisiana where he acted and won a state championship in debate. He went to college at New College, now New College of Florida, in Sarasota, Florida, and did […]

  • Dan Gilbert – Why are we happy ?

    From Wikipedia: Daniel Todd Gilbert (born November 5, 1957) is Professor of Psychology at Harvard University. He is a social psychologist known for his research (with Timothy Wilson of the University of Virginia) on affective forecasting, with a special emphasis on cognitive biases such as the impact bias. He is the author of the international bestseller Stumbling on Happiness, which has been translated into more than 25 languages […]

  • David Rock – Your Brain At Work @ Googletalk

    From Davidrock.net: Dr. David Rock coined the term ‘NeuroLeadership’ and co-founded the NeuroLeadership Institute, a global initiative bringing neuroscientists and leadership experts together to build a new science for leadership development. He co-edits the NeuroLeadership Journal and heads up an annual global summit. He is the author of 4 books including the 2009 business-best-seller ‘Your […]

  • Sir Ken Robinson – Do schools kill creativity ?

    From TED.com – Ken Robinson profile: bio from ted.com: Why don’t we get the best out of people? Sir Ken Robinson argues that it’s because we’ve been educated to become good workers, rather than creative thinkers. Students with restless minds and bodies — far from being cultivated for their energy and curiosity — are ignored […]